Pelvic Congestion Syndrome Research

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So I’ve been reading a lot of journal articles recently. I have stated before that one of the reasons I started this blog was to discover what other women were experiencing with PCS. I also want to keep track of what the medical fraternity is saying about it.

Last blog I wrote how having the surgery Update….Helped one Condition….Hurt the other  (

I spoke there about the challenges with my veins that I have been having since the op. The pics above explain what happens wen there is a diagnosis of Chronic Venous Insufficiency. Pelvic Congestion Syndrome is also known as Pelvic Venous Insufficiency/ Pelvic Venous Congestion. I guess if they can’t settle on a name that says something about how far the research has gotten 😦

In seeking to learn about the compression stockings and the issues others here face I had a conversation with a relative, this was after being in the same location and having to get some meds from her because my veins were popping again and the pain was starting to increase.

What was most interesting to hear, after the information about the stockings, was that years ago an OBGYN had said to her that she will probably have to wear stockings. That was the extent of the conversation. The doctor at the time gave no further information, no explanations; basically offered nothing. She believes that if she had been informed back then the situation would not be as dire now. Her diagnosis is Chronic Venous Insufficiency. Her issues are localized within her legs; while mine are pelvic  and only spill over into legs hmmmmmmmm.

This makes me wonder though, actually it makes me angry. Some doctors are just not worth the title.

My research has revealed a few things. Women who have or have had the following are more likely to develop Pelvic Congestion Syndrome. Of course there are always the exceptions. Note also that the number of studies done are so few that this information cannot be considered conclusive from a research methodology standpoint.

  • More than one child: they say this has to do with the veins being stretched by the weight of the baby through multiple pregnancies. Yes I know some women have never been pregnant and still have the condition. There also seems to be a genetic link in some cases. Maybe mothers just thought their issues were normal and never sought to investigate.
  • IUD: This has to do with the impact having a foreign object in the body for the extended period of time has and the changes that take place in the body as a result. I don’t fully understand from a scientific standpoint – really was never good at pure science- but I am told it leads to blockages and blood not being able to flow freely.
  • Tubal Ligation: Cutting/burning/ tying the Fallopian tubes clearly leads to a blockage and departure from the natural processes. This also leads to blood being rerouted and affects the flow- well at least in the most natural way.
  • Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus and other organs- depending on the type of hysterectomy- again causes several blockages. All the arteries and veins that fed the uterus need to be blocked off because the organ is no longer present. Therefore, with hormonal changes, the blood still rushes into the pelvis but one major outlet – menstruation- is gone. Hence there is increased congestion in an already tiny space.
  • Anorgasmia: This is an inability to reach orgasm or coming to the point of orgasm without achieving it. There are women who for whatever reason will engage in sexual activity and intercourse but choose to avoid the orgasm e.g could be fear of  the level of pain. I think I wrote about this in Sex………Love to Hate to Love It!!! There are also others who have never orgasmed or were previously able to orgasm but no longer can as a result of illness/ emotional issues.

Whatever the reason, by choice or involuntary,  this also leads to increased pressure           within the veins and pelvis and no outlet for it.

The studies that I read indicated all of the above either individually or jointly as risk factors to developing Pelvic Congestion Syndrome. I have had/ done/ used the first 4 and intentionally on occasion done the last one. Seems my situation is the perfect PCS storm 😉

Looking back, an IUD seemed like a good contraceptive method after I had my first child; after the second child a Tubal Ligation was a good decision since my family was complete and I definitely did not want any more children and the hysterectomy was the best treatment decision for the issues I was facing.

If I knew then what I know now, would I make the same decisions? Absolutely not!

That’s the thing about hindsight- its perfect vision 😦  I will not be angry or regretful about those decisions though. I always believe that once we did the best we could at the time with the information at hand, we should have no regrets.  Or at the very least, we should not live in the regret; acknowledge it and move on.

So, that I have done. I move on. I cannot reverse time and make different decisions. However, my knowledge now can help someone else.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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